I think I promised more about Bath and Stonehenge and didn’t really go into detail about the trip so here goes. Our day trip to Bath and Stonehenge was wonderful. For such an ancient place it seems huge, strong, and mystical. The energies flowing around the stones sent tinges down my spine. I can’t really describe it to you, it was simply startling and awe inspiring. I only wish I had gotten the chance to get closer, perhaps touch the stones and be able to experience their wonder firsthand. We spent about an hour and a half walking the circle and reveling in the innate wonder which stems from that magical place upon the hill, cleared pasture lands all around make it even more stunning because it is alone surrounded by plains. We boarded the bus and drove on.

I took a nap, it’s still a bit hard for me to wake up at 7:00 and not nap on the bus. We arrived then in the most beautiful (well a tie with Oxford) city I have seen here in London – Bath. Gorgeous stone works, natural parks, obelisks, and of course the highlights, the Abbey and the Roman baths. We wandered the streets of bath for an hour and a half before our tour began of the Baths. I found a hole in the wall pub up the street from the abbey and enjoyed a hearty meal of corned beef and mash. Then I wandered up to the top of the hill and looked at the crescent (HUGE building full of apartments) and its front lawn (huge park). Then we wandered back toward bath and found the Jane Austen Center, We walked around a bit and had a blast on our way back down to the abbey. We arrived back at the Roman baths at 10 till our tour and decided to grab some fresh fudge from the little shop across the way. It was DELICIOUS! After sitting outside and admiring the stonework and the beauty of the abbey and rebuilt bath complex (museum) we started our tour of the Baths. I’ve got plenty of pictures.

The baths themselves are filled with that trademark green murky water, full of minerals and who knows what. The old ruins have been built over so there’s only segments left, but once down into the ruins (below street level) there’s chunks left of the old roman architecture and ruins. Steam rooms, changing rooms piping and of course the font of the water itself the spring, steaming and gurgling forth into the complex pipes below our feet. The stonework that was left and the engineering that was done by the Romans is awe inspiring. To have accomplished such a thing at such a time is simply amazing. Note that the idea of bathing is one that should always be strongly considered.

There were pieces of bronze gilding and pieced together parts of walls and carved art. It really was wonderful to see it; I only wish it had been more preserved. We finished the tour and I bought a glass for the spring water to drink. We’ll see how it works out for me. Personally I found the entire trip to be quite satisfying. The wonder of Ancient Stonehenge combined with the awe of the architectural mastery of the ruins of the roman baths was stunning. To top it off me also explored the Abbey next to the baths. The abbey itself was beautiful, with stained glass and what seemed like embroidered ceilings. The graves and the sculptures which marked the loved held for those residing within were beautiful. With the exploration completed we wandered back to the bus and headed home.
Stonehenge allowed me a deeper understanding of English prehistory through its myriad of probable uses. Was it religious? Or a show of force? Regardless it is a symbol of an ancient people making a statement about their power, culture and beliefs and that statement is standing tall thousands of years after it was constructed. Whoever those people were who first erected Stonehenge they were competent, able and constructed a wonder that has lasted throughout time. The Romans and their influence on England seem positive. Bringing advanced construction techniques, bathing, social structure, and order they impacted Britain and helped created the civilized society which is here today. Seeing remnants of that mighty influence really brings home just how much of and impact it really had.